Planning Permission is required in the UK for any enlargement, improvement or other alteration to a dwelling. However, structures such as conservatories, orangeries and garden buildings usually fall under Permitted Development and do not require permission.

NB: There are exceptions to this rule, which are detailed below. This guidance applies to the regulations in England but may differ in Wales, Scotland or Ireland. For your own protection, you should check with your local authority before proceeding with any work.


In order for a conservatory or orangery to be classed as permitted development, the following conditions must be met:

  • On Designated Land, cladding of any part of the exterior of a dwelling (including extensions and conservatories) with stone, artificial stone, pebbledash, render, timber, plastic or tiles is not permitted. On Designated Land or Sites of Special Scientific Interest, the regime for larger single storey rear extensions (which runs until 30 May 2019) does NOT apply. See point 8 for further information. Designated Land includes national parks, the Norfolk Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage sites. On designated land, conservatories must not extend beyond any side wall of the original house.
  • Conservatories, previous extensions and other buildings must not be more than 50% of the total area of land around the original house.
  • Original House means the house as it was first built or how it was at 1 July 1948 (if it was built prior to that date). Although you may not have constructed an extension, a previous owner may have done so.
  • Conservatories must not extend forward of the principal or side elevation of the original house and fronting a highway
  • A side conservatory must not be wider than half of the width of the original house
  • A side conservatory must be single storey and no higher than 4.0 metres.
  • If a side or rear conservatory is within 2.0 metres of a boundary, it should be a maximum of 3.0 metres high.
  • A single storey rear conservatory must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than 3.0 metres if an attached house or 4.0 metres if the house is detached. Until 30 May 2019, these limits have been increased to 6.0 metres for attached and 8.0 metres but do not apply to Designated Land or Sites of Specific Scientific Interest.


  • Book a Conservatory Design Consulatation with one of our specialists and let us help you find the right conservatory for your needs. Alternatively, why not Design Your Own Conservatory and get an immediate quote.

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